Difference between revisions of "V grammar"

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(New page: ''Due to scouts' lack of complete information on the Nognese lexicon, the article presents some examples using English words.'' == Word order == V is fairly consistently head-initial, and...)
 
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=== Before the verb ===
 
=== Before the verb ===
A noun phrase may move in front of the verb to mark it as a topic, but it leaves a pronoun behind: "Gus, is he [a] poli."
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A sentence adverb may occupy the position before the verb; this happens especially in questions.
This does not work when a sentence adverb already occupies this position, such as in a question.
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Otherwise, a noun phrase may move in front of the verb to mark it as a topic, but it leaves a pronoun behind: "Gus, is he [a] poli."
  
 
=== Noun phrases ===
 
=== Noun phrases ===
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Continuous aspects (also called progressive aspects) are more likely to use split inflection.
 
Continuous aspects (also called progressive aspects) are more likely to use split inflection.
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[[Category:Languages of Noen]]

Revision as of 02:57, 2 December 2009

Due to scouts' lack of complete information on the Nognese lexicon, the article presents some examples using English words.

Word order

V is fairly consistently head-initial, and the overall order of a clause is Verb Subject Object (VSO). But some auxiliary verbs have what is called "split inflection", which pushes the main verb into the object position resulting in AuxSVO order; the verb and object behave together as a noun clause.

Before the verb

A sentence adverb may occupy the position before the verb; this happens especially in questions. Otherwise, a noun phrase may move in front of the verb to mark it as a topic, but it leaves a pronoun behind: "Gus, is he [a] poli."

Noun phrases

Nouns act head-initial as well. As in Spanish, most adjectives follow the noun, except for demonstratives and cardinal numbers. Numbers precede the noun for much the same reason they follow in Japanese, namely that they act as nouns meaning a set of that size, taking the specific noun as a genitive: English "three fingers" becomes something more like "set-of-three [of] fingers". Likewise, demonstratives are seen as pronouns taking an appositive: "this ball" parses as "this, [a] ball"

Inflection

not yet

Continuous aspects (also called progressive aspects) are more likely to use split inflection.