Difference between revisions of "Cable finder"

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(This replaces part of the single-screen multiplayer article)
 
(wikipedia)
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== Background ==
 
== Background ==
In 1987, IBM released the Video Gate Array (VGA) card, which could generate a color video signal with enhanced definition.
+
In 1987, IBM released the [[wikipedia:Video Graphics Array|Video Graphics Array (VGA) card]], which could generate a color video signal with [[wikipedia:480p|480p]] [[wikipedia:Enhanced-definition television|enhanced definition]].
But for about two decades afterward, connecting a PC to a TV to a television was considered a "hard problem".
+
But for about two decades afterward, connecting a PC to a TV was considered a "hard problem".
Most TVs were boxy CRT SDTVs (cathode ray tube standard-definition televisions).
+
Most TVs of the time were boxy [[wikipedia:Cathode ray tube|CRT]] [[wikipedia:Standard-definition television|SDTVs]] (cathode ray tube standard-definition televisions).
These required a "scan converter" to turn the EDTV (enhanced-definition television) or HDTV (high-definition television) signal from a monitor into an SDTV signal that the TV can use.
+
These required a [[wikipedia:Scan conversion|scan converter]] to turn the EDTV (enhanced-definition television) or [[wikipedia:High-definition television|HDTV]] (high-definition television) signal from a monitor into an SDTV signal that the TV can use.
But starting around the early 2000s, video cards using an NVIDIA or ATI chipset began to incorporate a TV output with a scan converter right on the card.
+
But starting around the early 2000s, video cards using a chipset made by NVIDIA or ATI began to incorporate a TV output with a scan converter right on the card.
 
Furthermore, as of 2008, people are replacing their SDTV sets with HDTV sets, which have the same ports on the back as a PC monitor.
 
Furthermore, as of 2008, people are replacing their SDTV sets with HDTV sets, which have the same ports on the back as a PC monitor.
 +
 +
== Video connector ==
  
 
First find the video output connectors on the back of your computer and your monitor or TV set.
 
First find the video output connectors on the back of your computer and your monitor or TV set.
 +
Then compare them to the pictures on Wikipedia:
 +
 +
*[[wikipedia:RCA connector|RCA connector]]: a yellow one usually carries [[wikipedia:Composite video|composite video]]
 +
*[[wikipedia:S-Video|S-Video connector]]: round, 4 pins
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*[[wikipedia:VGA connector|VGA connector]]: DE-15
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*[[wikipedia:Digital Visual Interface|DVI connector]]: D-shaped, longer than VGA
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*[[wikipedia:HDMI|HDMI connector]]
  
''To be added: diagrams of each port''
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''To be added: gallery of photos of each port''
  
 
=== HDTV ===
 
=== HDTV ===
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=== SDTV ===
 
=== SDTV ===
Do not confuse composite (yellow) connections with audio (white or red) connections.
+
Do not confuse RCA connectors that carry composite video (yellow) with those carrying audio (white or red), or you'll hear a horrible buzzing noise from your TV's speakers.
 
{|
 
{|
 
! Your computer || Your monitor || Required cable
 
! Your computer || Your monitor || Required cable

Revision as of 17:33, 29 September 2009

This page helps you find the cables you need to connect a personal computer to a television.

Background

In 1987, IBM released the Video Graphics Array (VGA) card, which could generate a color video signal with 480p enhanced definition. But for about two decades afterward, connecting a PC to a TV was considered a "hard problem". Most TVs of the time were boxy CRT SDTVs (cathode ray tube standard-definition televisions). These required a scan converter to turn the EDTV (enhanced-definition television) or HDTV (high-definition television) signal from a monitor into an SDTV signal that the TV can use. But starting around the early 2000s, video cards using a chipset made by NVIDIA or ATI began to incorporate a TV output with a scan converter right on the card. Furthermore, as of 2008, people are replacing their SDTV sets with HDTV sets, which have the same ports on the back as a PC monitor.

Video connector

First find the video output connectors on the back of your computer and your monitor or TV set. Then compare them to the pictures on Wikipedia:

To be added: gallery of photos of each port

HDTV

Your computer Your monitor Required cable
VGA VGA VGA cable
DVI (DVI-I) VGA DVI-to-VGA cable
DVI DVI DVI cable
DVI HDMI DVI-to-HDMI cable
HDMI DVI DVI-to-HDMI cable
HDMI HDMI HDMI cable

SDTV

Do not confuse RCA connectors that carry composite video (yellow) with those carrying audio (white or red), or you'll hear a horrible buzzing noise from your TV's speakers.

Your computer Your monitor Required cable
S-Video (4 or 7 pin) S-Video (4 pin) S-video cable
S-Video Composite S-Video cable
Composite Composite RCA cable
VGA Composite Scan converter and RCA cable
VGA S-Video Scan converter and S-Video cable
DVI-I Composite Scan converter, DVI-to-VGA cable, and RCA cable
DVI-I S-Video Scan converter, DVI-to-VGA cable, and S-Video cable

If you need a scan converter, I've had decent results with the SW-22050 from Sewell.