User:Eighty5cacao/misc/WMG dump/Yume Nikki

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One-liners

  • Madotsuki's "Family Game" (ファミリィゲーム) console is a combination of a famiclone and a clone of a 16-bit console; she once owned a version of Lemmings for the 16-bit side, but the cartridge became lost, stolen, or damaged.[1]
  • Madotsuki has Charles Bonnet syndrome, exacerbated by a head injury suffered while riding a bicycle without a helmet.[2]

Extreme crackpot theories

  • Yume Nikki takes place in the universe of Dilbert; in particular, Monoko is a product of the Dogbert Temp Agency or one of its subcontractors.[3]

Extended writeups for All The Tropes

Footnotes

  1. The console's name is untranslated in the English fan translation and translated as "Famtendo Game" in the official English version for Windows. (The mobile ports just call it a "Video Game," presumably to comply with the policies of the respective platforms' app stores.)
    The console appears to have two cartridge slots. Although there exist famiclones with both 60-pin and 72-pin slots, the NES version of Lemmings was not officially released in Japan, hence a 16-bit version is more likely (if the cartrige is legitimate). A clone console capable of running said version would have been uncommon during the time that the authentic Famicom was contemporary.
    Among other things, experience with Lemmings would explain the appearance of the Midget effect, in particular why there can be more than one midget at a time and why the midgets explode so spectacularly.
    Cartridges traded with friends would count as "lost."
  2. Charles Bonnet syndrome, now properly known as visual release hallucinations, often produces Lilliputian hallucinations similar to the Midget effect and leads to social isolation. See also the BBC's report on one case.
  3. The Dogbert Temp Agency arc, published on 2000 November 15–18, depicts a temporary employee created via genetic engineering by the titular agency. Other relevant strips include a hole-headed juror (2000 December 6; cf. Pirori and Nopperabou Witches) and an all-hands meeting (2007 July 9; cf. the Eyeball World and Staircase of Hands).