Difference between revisions of "Talk:Homebrew downsides"

From Pin Eight
Jump to: navigation, search
(Improving Programmer Art: new section)
 
Line 6: Line 6:
  
 
Jailbreaking a console also risks it getting banned when it goes online, for obvious reasons. I don't know about homebrew activists, but I'd like to still use my Nintendo Switch to play ''Splatoon 2'' and ''Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate''. [[User:Ray Marina|Ray Marina]] ([[User talk:Ray Marina|talk]]) 01:12, 28 May 2020 (UTC)
 
Jailbreaking a console also risks it getting banned when it goes online, for obvious reasons. I don't know about homebrew activists, but I'd like to still use my Nintendo Switch to play ''Splatoon 2'' and ''Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate''. [[User:Ray Marina|Ray Marina]] ([[User talk:Ray Marina|talk]]) 01:12, 28 May 2020 (UTC)
 +
 +
== Improving Programmer Art ==
 +
 +
[https://1034co.neocities.org/nulayo/pics/ I am an artist who mostly draws in a style vaguely reminiscent of most 'anime'.]
 +
 +
In my online art portfolio, I've uploaded a lot of drawings(complete with my commentary), some of which are very old. Usually, when I link this to someone, I'd recommend them to take a look mainly at drawings from 2017 and later. For the purposes of this topic, if you take a look at my older drawings, you'll see that they tend to lack anatomical structure. Also, the few of them that do have shading don't properly imply the correct forms.
 +
 +
However, around the summer of 2016, I finally realised my art's anatomical issues and have since committed to drawing the simplified, basic structure first before adding details to it. It took me until 2018 to start addressing the improper shading issue as well, though by that point, I rarely shaded my drawings in fear that the poor shading quality would return.
 +
 +
Overall, I think the peak of my visual art was around 2018. Keeping this in mind, it took me 3 years to get to the level of quality my drawings bear now, however mediocre they still tend to be.
 +
 +
My point? If you make the most out of what little time you have at home per day, you can turn all of those hours into an art-focused intellectual workout.
 +
 +
Let me put it in a language you can understand. Say you only have 6 hours of free time after a weekday job. Assuming you are active for 12 hours a day, that means you have 24 + 5(6) = 54 hours every week. If you multiply 54 by 52 (the approximate amount of weeks in a year), that means you have
 +
2,808 hours of free time per year. It would be equal to 234 days of a [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEET NEET's] life, or 2/3 of a NEET's year.
 +
 +
Here's my raw equation so that you can make a more accurate calculation:
 +
 +
  2e + 5d = f <- total weekly free time
 +
  |    |
 +
  |  free time per weekday
 +
  awake hours per weekend day
 +
 +
There's some other factors to take in, like how much time is necessary to... relieve stress, and how long it takes to... do necessary bodily functions(that take variable amounts of time), as well as your priorities in life and holidays(and Corona if we're still not done with that yet in the near-future).
 +
 +
As for quick alternative workarounds, you can:
 +
 +
- Use a minimalist art style. Indie games with minimalist art styles are all the rage nowadays. If you're developing a game for tile-based systems, an art style that emphasises rectangular shapes and symmetry would work in your favour. People in homebrew communities might see this as nothing more than a lazy cop-out, especially if your game is for a more advanced system like the SNES or Mega Drive where homebrew players would generally expect no less than the best-of-the-best graphics.
 +
 +
- Adopt a photographic collage aesthetic. You would use photos of real places and photograph yourself in various poses just like what Midway did with Mortal Kombat. You could even make the game look like it's actually on paper, kind of like a photographic Comix Zone. There can be problems with making sure that you don't catch people in your backgrounds. If you're developing the game for older video game systems like the SNES or Mega Drive, you'll have to spend time optimising each frame of animation to look best within the systems' limitations, and you'll have to take various measures in order to get the backgrounds to fit into VRAM. Also, depending on where you live, you might not have enough space to move around, especially when you have to be in front of a plain green or blue sheet. You'll also have to have really good (read: really bright) lighting to ensure visual legibility. People in homebrew communities would generally prefer hand-drawn graphics and might think digitised photographic games look too silly, or just plain horrible.
 +
 +
--[[User:Nikku4211|Nikku4211]] ([[User talk:Nikku4211|talk]]) 03:36, 18 November 2020 (UTC)

Latest revision as of 03:36, 18 November 2020

Indie? Skip it.[edit]

It turns out there are people who choose not to play indie games entirely. YesIAmAScript of Slashdot is one of them. --Tepples 12:59, 20 April 2011 (MST)

Online connection[edit]

Jailbreaking a console also risks it getting banned when it goes online, for obvious reasons. I don't know about homebrew activists, but I'd like to still use my Nintendo Switch to play Splatoon 2 and Monster Hunter Generations Ultimate. Ray Marina (talk) 01:12, 28 May 2020 (UTC)

Improving Programmer Art[edit]

I am an artist who mostly draws in a style vaguely reminiscent of most 'anime'.

In my online art portfolio, I've uploaded a lot of drawings(complete with my commentary), some of which are very old. Usually, when I link this to someone, I'd recommend them to take a look mainly at drawings from 2017 and later. For the purposes of this topic, if you take a look at my older drawings, you'll see that they tend to lack anatomical structure. Also, the few of them that do have shading don't properly imply the correct forms.

However, around the summer of 2016, I finally realised my art's anatomical issues and have since committed to drawing the simplified, basic structure first before adding details to it. It took me until 2018 to start addressing the improper shading issue as well, though by that point, I rarely shaded my drawings in fear that the poor shading quality would return.

Overall, I think the peak of my visual art was around 2018. Keeping this in mind, it took me 3 years to get to the level of quality my drawings bear now, however mediocre they still tend to be.

My point? If you make the most out of what little time you have at home per day, you can turn all of those hours into an art-focused intellectual workout.

Let me put it in a language you can understand. Say you only have 6 hours of free time after a weekday job. Assuming you are active for 12 hours a day, that means you have 24 + 5(6) = 54 hours every week. If you multiply 54 by 52 (the approximate amount of weeks in a year), that means you have 2,808 hours of free time per year. It would be equal to 234 days of a NEET's life, or 2/3 of a NEET's year.

Here's my raw equation so that you can make a more accurate calculation:

 2e + 5d = f <- total weekly free time
  |    |
  |   free time per weekday
 awake hours per weekend day

There's some other factors to take in, like how much time is necessary to... relieve stress, and how long it takes to... do necessary bodily functions(that take variable amounts of time), as well as your priorities in life and holidays(and Corona if we're still not done with that yet in the near-future).

As for quick alternative workarounds, you can:

- Use a minimalist art style. Indie games with minimalist art styles are all the rage nowadays. If you're developing a game for tile-based systems, an art style that emphasises rectangular shapes and symmetry would work in your favour. People in homebrew communities might see this as nothing more than a lazy cop-out, especially if your game is for a more advanced system like the SNES or Mega Drive where homebrew players would generally expect no less than the best-of-the-best graphics.

- Adopt a photographic collage aesthetic. You would use photos of real places and photograph yourself in various poses just like what Midway did with Mortal Kombat. You could even make the game look like it's actually on paper, kind of like a photographic Comix Zone. There can be problems with making sure that you don't catch people in your backgrounds. If you're developing the game for older video game systems like the SNES or Mega Drive, you'll have to spend time optimising each frame of animation to look best within the systems' limitations, and you'll have to take various measures in order to get the backgrounds to fit into VRAM. Also, depending on where you live, you might not have enough space to move around, especially when you have to be in front of a plain green or blue sheet. You'll also have to have really good (read: really bright) lighting to ensure visual legibility. People in homebrew communities would generally prefer hand-drawn graphics and might think digitised photographic games look too silly, or just plain horrible.

--Nikku4211 (talk) 03:36, 18 November 2020 (UTC)